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Choosing The Right Wound Dressing

A wide variety of advanced wound care products are available to treat wounds, from simple dressing materials to sophisticated products. Selecting a wound dressing requires the clinician to be knowledgeable in both the process of tissue repair during wound healing and the intended use of the dressing product selected to treat the wound.1

Dressings are used to:

  • facilitate healing
  • reduce pain
  • contain wound drainage
  • provide adequate moisture for wound healing
  • maintain normothermia in the wound bed
  • minimize bioburden
  • provide a cosmetic covering for the wound

The correct dressing will improve outcomes for wound healing. Dressing selections should be based on a complete clinical assessment addressing wound characteristics, clinical efficacy, and cost of the dressing.1

Wound Characteristics
Dressing selections should be based on the type of tissue present in the wound, wound drainage, bacterial burden, condition of the periwound skin and the wound location.2 Read more ›

Posted in Articles, Clinical Insights Newsletter

Senior Digestive Health

Senior Digestive Health

Many systems of the body change with age, including the digestive system. It’s estimated that 40% of seniors experience digestive changes. 1 Many factors impact bowel health and result in constipation including age, medical conditions, poor diet, medications, lack of fiber, inadequate exercise and frequent laxative use. Constipation or diarrhea, a common complaint for seniors, is a symptom the body sends indicating that something is not right.3

What is Constipation?  Simply stated, constipation is infrequent stool elimination. After eating, food is passed through the intestines by a rhythmic, wavelike movement called peristalsis. Intestinal contraction and rest allows food and liquid to be mixed together and propels fecal matter through the digestive tract for elimination. 4 Humans are creatures of habit, and bowel habits will vary. Bowel movements from 3 times per day to once every other day can be considered “normal”. Infrequent stools become hard, difficult to pass, and can cause damage to the nerves and muscles in the rectal area.4 Read more ›

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Palliative Wound Care

Palliative Wound CarePalliative care is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an “approach that improves quality of life in patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illnesses”. 1 Palliative care focuses on prevention and relief from suffering, providing pain control, spiritual support and symptom control, done with respect for cultural differences and individual needs. Care decisions should be made through a process that involves open dialogue between patient, family and caregivers. 1 Read more ›

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Managing Pain with Dressing Changes

managing pain

F-Tag 309 is a government regulation that deals with pain stating: “Each resident must receive and the facility must provide the necessary care and services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being, in accordance with the comprehensive assessment and plan of care”.  (1) Read more ›

Posted in Articles, Clinical Insights Newsletter

Impact of Dehydration on Wound Healing

dehydration-wound healing

What is the role of water?
Water plays a vital role in our overall health and may be the most important nutrient of life. Roughly two-thirds of our body is comprised of water. Since the body is not capable of storing water, daily replacement of lost fluids is needed for cellular functions such as delivering nutrients and oxygen to the cells, removing waste products and toxins, lubricating joints, protecting the central nervous system, retaining acid base balance and maintaining adequate tissue temperature. (3) Sufficient oral intake of water is vital to these functions.   Read more ›

Posted in Articles, Clinical Insights Newsletter

Obesity and Wound Healing

Obesity and wound healing

Obesity is a national health concern impacting over 35% of our adult population above the age of 60.1 Obesity can be directly related to heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and some cancers, but did you know that obesity also affects our ability to heal wounds?3

Several things occur as we gain weight. First, the demands on the circulatory system are stressed due to the increased amount of adipose (fat) tissue. The vascular system becomes overwhelmed and can’t supply the required oxygen and nutrients,   resulting in chronic inflammation.4  Decreased tissue oxygenation also negatively affects the ability of fibroblasts to produce collagen, a vital component for healing and wound tensile strength. 5  Read more ›

Posted in Articles, Clinical Insights Newsletter

UTI Prevention – Minimizing Antibiotic Overuse

antibiotic overuse

Recently, the CDC released the Core Elements for Antibiotic Stewardship for Nursing Homes to provide guidance to Long Term Care (LTC) facilities related to antibiotic prescribing practices. The CDC guidelines are designed to reduce antibiotic overuse and decrease the alarming rise in antibiotic resistant infections. (2) Antibiotics provide an astonishing value to healthcare, however, over prescribing these drugs threatens the longevity of their effectiveness due to the ability of bacteria to develop defense mechanisms and resistance to antibiotics.  Newly emerging antibiotic therapies are not being developed fast enough to keep up with the growing resistance capabilities of bacteria. (7) Our practices need to change to protect current therapeutic drugs and still meet the healthcare needs of our residents. Read more ›

Posted in Articles, Clinical Insights Newsletter
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